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  • Did Early Humans Cook Their Meals in Hot Springs?

    An international team of researchers suggests that early humans living in East Africa may have cooked their food in hot springs. Find out more https://www.archaeology.org/news/9029-200916-tanzania-hot-spring read more...

  • Alberta oil sands tailings ponds may be tainting groundwater

    An environmental watchdog says it has found “scientifically valid evidence” that Alberta’s oilsands tailings ponds are contaminating groundwater sources. Alberta’s chief scientist says he is reviewing their report. Find out more https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/oilsands-tailings-groundwater-contamination-1.5711471 read more...

  • Groundwater crisis in Zimbabwe brought on by droughts

    Zimbabwe’s groundwater is disappearing fast, leaving rural communities without water for household and agricultural use. Although drought years are part of the normal climate cycle in this part of Africa global warming is causing droughts to become more frequent, more intense and less predictable. Find out more https://eos.org/articles/groundwater-crisis-in-zimbabwe-brought-on-by-droughts#:~:text=Zimbabwe’s%20groundwater%20is%20disappearing%20fast,for%20household%20and%20agricultural%20use.&text=%E2%80%9CModels%20predict%20an%20average%20rainfall,the%20end%20of%20the%20century read more...

  • Groundwater stores resilient to climate change – though caution required

    A new study suggests fewer aquifers are depleting than previously but the authors urge caution in unsustainable extraction levels. The findings suggest that although groundwater depletion is occurring in many parts of the world the scale of depletion is more localised than past studies have indicated. Find out more https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-08/uos-mog082520.php read more...

  • Some California cities think they’re safe from sea level rise. They may not be…

    Sea level rise is a lot more complicated than just waves breaking over seawalls and beaches disappearing. As the ocean level rises inland it will push groundwater upward until it breaks the surface. Basements will heave, brackish water could corrode sewer pipes, toxic contaminants buried in the soil could bubble... read more...

  • The answer to southern Africa’s worsening water shortages may lie beneath its feet

    Used sustainably, groundwater could provide potable water for the estimated 40% of inhabitants in southern Africa who currently lack access to safe drinking water and sanitation services. It could alleviate pressure on the region’s surface water and support smallholder agriculture, strengthening food security and supporting resilient livelihoods. Find out more... read more...

  • Nile Basin Initiative – USD 5.3 million groundwater project kicks off

    The project aims to improve the understanding of available groundwater resources and demonstrate how to optimise the joint use of surface and ground waters. It covers three shared aquifers involving seven countries: Kagera aquifer shared by Burundi, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda; Mt. Elgon aquifer shared by Kenya and Uganda and... read more...

  • Bridging the gender gap through groundwater monitoring in a Rajasthan village

    A group of trained farmer-researchers, ‘Bhujal Jaankars’ in two Rajasthan and Gujarat watersheds monitor groundwater levels under a village-level project for groundwater sustainability..Most of the farmer-researchers are men but the project seeks to include more women, as it expands to other parts of the country. Find out more https://india.mongabay.com/2020/06/bridging-the-gender-gap-through-groundwater-monitoring-in-a-rajasthan-village/   read more...

  • In memorium – Prof Yorum Eckstein, PhD

    As reported recently by IWRA, we sadly announce the passing of Prof. Yorum Eckstein, former Associate Editors for Water International, and the father of IWRA current President Gabriel Ekstein. He passed away suddenly on Saturday June 27th following a long period of poor health. Prof. Yorum Eckstein was an internationally... read more...

  • Wiktor Bakiewicz, 1930-2020

    The distinguished hydrogeologist Wiktor Bakiewicz has died. He was born in Poland in 1930 and he and his family moved to the UK shortly after the Second World War. He studied geology in London and, after a stint as a geophysical logger with Schlumberger in Latin America, embarked on a... read more...

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